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Tips for Starting a Fitness Club at Your School

Posted 3 months ago - by Peter Boucher

Reach and teach the benefits of an active and healthy lifestyle to more students at your school by starting a fitness club. Continue reading to learn helpful tips and strategies for launching a fitness club at your school!

For at least the past decade or more, K-12 Physical Education teachers have been encouraged to focus on fitness and activity in our classrooms to help combat the rising obesity rates in the U.S. The vast majority of P.E. and Wellness teachers are incredibly dedicated in their commitment to “reach and teach” all of their students from a fitness perspective. One of the biggest challenges to this commitment or goal is that students typically only have Physical Education classes once or twice a week due to budget and schedule restraints. Others have it for one quarter or semester and then not at all for the remainder of the school year. As fitness professionals, we all would likely agree that challenged scheduling is not going to help our students achieve any long-term fitness goals during school hours.  So if these schedules appear to not be changing (and most will not unfortunately), what is the next step or potential genesis of helping students achieve some authentic fitness goals?

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Many schools are now looking at Fitness Clubs either before or after school to help augment the PE staff’s and curriculum’s fitness pursuits.  Establishing a fitness club is a tremendous opportunity to build school spirit, galvanize staff and students, and make fitness and activity a healthy focus at your school.  Here’s what we did at my school and what I would recommend as the critical steps to getting a Fitness Club up and running, literally! 

Obtain approval

I always recommend seeking approval from the Principal, Athletic Director, or staff member in charge of clubs and activities before doing anything else.  Being certain you have followed all of the district’s protocols for starting anew club is significant and can help you avoid unnecessary hurdles, speed bumps, and potholes down the road.

 

Seek “People Power”

Approach staff and/or parents that you have connected with who share your desire for fitness.  Plant the seed about your idea and see who would be willing to help.  Once you have some committed staff and parents, you’ll probably need both, you can then begin to forge a game plan.  Committed adults will be critical to your successful club launch.

 

Build a Plan

This part is tri-fold and important, as your infrastructure will be paramount to your success.  You will want to complete the following three initiatives before you seek out students:

  • Determine whether your club will be pre- or post-school and what days you will meet
  • Build a “curriculum” of fun activities for your club sessions
  • Secure space outside of your school for good weather days and explore space inside your school for the inclement or cold weather days

 

Put the Word Out

Begin to announce to the student body, staff, and your families that you have limited space and are launching a fun fitness club.  Morning announcements, flyers around school, social media, and newsletters proved very helpful when we launched our fitness club.  I recommend the “limited space” verbiage because it is probably true that you can only host a certain number of kids (safe supervision) and it also adds a little positive pressure to sign-up quickly so as not to be left out of the limited number of spaces in the club.

 

Launch with Energy & Enthusiasm!

Kick off the Fitness Club with all the energy, enthusiasm, and excitement that you can muster! We had a blast!  Everything was meticulously planned for maximum activity and movement. We had the music pumping, actions planned for almost zero transition time, and the very best fun and active games that we could design so that the morning session (we chose mornings twice a week for our Fitness Club) was active and awesome for the students and staff.  Everyone couldn’t wait for day two!

 

Additional components you can explore and expand with once your club is up and running:

  • Have fun formulating a cool and fun name for your fitness club
  • Consider finding financial support for club t-shirts for students and staff
  • Healthy snacks for after the club is fun, too.  Our parents were so supportive that they worked with our cafeteria staff to provide a modest healthy breakfast for all of our fitness club members.
  • Determine a culminating goal for each season (fall, winter, spring); our fitness club started with a 1-mile, then a 2-mile fun run in our community, and now (4+ years into existence) evolved into attending an annual 5K that all of the fitness club student and staff members run and walk.

So these are the tips and strategies that we used to start a small club that has become a beloved and very successful fitness club to augment and support our physical education and fitness curriculum. I recommend utilizing these steps to explore and ultimately launch your club too. 

What other ideas do other professionals or parents have? Are there other steps that could help or streamline the process? Check in and let us know what you think or if you have a question about starting your own fitness club. 

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Fitness Bars: A Total Body Workout for P.E. [Video]

Posted 3 months ago - by Gopher Community

A great way to introduce your students to fitness training is to get a fitness bar in their hands! Fitness bars, also referred to as aerobic body bars, take your class workout to the next level. They are great for building muscle definition and teaching better lifting technique. Add resistance to any movement and help acclimate your students to resistance training. We compiled exercises for a complete physical education class bar workout! In the video playlist above, you’ll find fitness bar exercises for upper body, lower body, core, balance, and flexibility/agility, with a total of 25 fitness exercises!

Fitness bars are available individually in 6 sizes and also in multiple pack options that are perfect for physical education. Receive free shipping on UltraFit™ Fitness Bars today by using the promo code VideoFreeShip at checkout!

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Upper Body

Fitness Bars are extremely versatile and offer a great upper body bar workout.

 

 

Lower Body

Balance the bar in a rack position or hold the bar for a variety of lower body exercises.

 

 

Core

Perform core exercises like V-Up Sit Ups or Balancing Rows.

 

 

Balance

Use Gopher's Fitness Bars to either add resistance to balancing exercises or help maintain balance during movements.

 

 

Flexibility/Agility

Increase flexibility by using the bar similar to stretching stick. Also, lay the bar on the floor to practice agility movements.

 

 

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Curriculum Organization Tips for Physical Education

Posted 3 months ago - by Jessica Shawley

Purposeful planning, organizing, and reflection are key components to quality teaching. I’m always asking myself: How can I be more mindful in enhancing the learning experience for my students? The answers to this question help refine my curriculum organization practices. It is important for teachers to develop an organized and dynamic curriculum, one that can be modified and grow with time. Teachers must have a plan for implementing and assessing curriculum progressions to help students achieve learning outcomes. So how do I keep it all organized? Here’s a look into a few of my curriculum organization practices.

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1. Develop a purposeful plan

Identify the key standards and grade-level outcomes you will be addressing or measuring. Determine how you will measure this. Develop learning activities to help students achieve these outcomes. My department has created a curriculum map. It’s a large document that has all the nitty-gritty details of everything we want to do including learning targets, essential questions, learning activities, assessments, and a timeline. From this larger curriculum map, I created an “at-a-glance” chart that acts like my Cliff Notes. This helps me see overall progressions quickly to assist my lesson planning. All documents are in a shared Google Drive folder (there is a Team Drive option if you collaborate with others or a department). This allows our department to collaborate easily. There are a lot of resources available on how to map out a curriculum and design-standards-based lessons. Here are just a few:

 

2. Develop a lesson plan library 

Now that I have a curriculum map and “at-a-glance” chart in hand, I need to organize all my ideas, lessons, and activities and link them together for easy access. Everything is saved in the shared Google Drive folder mentioned earlier. The warm-ups are in a “warm-ups library” folder, fitness activities are in the “fitness library” folder and these are linked to the headers in my “at-a-glance” chart so I can easily access them from one main planning document. Check out the screenshot below to help clarify. Physical Education Specialist, Kevin Tiller, has a YouTube video explaining his Google Drive Lesson Plan Library organization here. It is similar to how I organize my folders that I link to my overall planning documents – the curriculum map and “at-a-glance” chart. Terri Drain has an excellent video on “Planning a Standards Based Lesson” on YouTube if you’d like more on that topic as well.

 

 

3. Post essential questions and learning targets

What does it mean to be fit? Why should I be fit? How will I know if I am fit? These are important essential questions for students to think about in physical education. Fitness is a year-round focus in my physical education program. It manifests itself through a variety of activities. Some activities may or may not look like “traditional fitness” yet all activities are designed to help students achieve the goal of lifelong fitness. My learning activities help students reflect upon their interests, strengths, and weaknesses and help them develop a lifelong fitness plan.

Having essential questions and learning targets in view helps communicate what students need to know and be able to do. This information also guides my opening and closing class discussions. Utilizing essential questions and learning targets are an important component to your teaching. Use them! I have fallen in love with the ClassCue Sign Holder to post my learning targets, essential questions, and station signs. It is the feature image for this blog.

 

4. Reflect and Record

Reflect upon your planning and implementation and record it so you can enhance the learning experience next time. I use Google Drive to develop and organize my lesson content. I write lesson Cliff Notes and reflections in a small notebook that accompanies me wherever I go along with my iPad open to my Google Drive app lesson content. I write follow-up notes and reflections in my small notebook. I then transfer the notes to my Google Drive lesson plan library. When I go to teach this content again, I know how to make it better.

 

Bonus Tip: Relationships. In all things, it always comes back to relationships. It starts with us. The teacher is the catalyst for the positive learning environment. Regardless of learning outcome, the curriculum content, or the weather, the teacher’s mindset lays the foundation for success. Build relationships with your students. Be positive and have fun teaching!

 

If you need new curriculum ideas, here are two great places to start:

  • SHAPE America offers awesome webinars, trainings, and their Exchange forum allows you to post questions where you receive supporting answers and ideas from other professional members.
  • The Voxer Physical Education community is very supportive, and you can join in discussion groups to gain new ideas. You can also check out a previous post “My Web-Based Toolbox for Professional Development” for more ideas on how to keep learning. 

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P.E. Activities with Cones, Hoops, and Poly Spots

Posted 3 months ago - by Michael Beringer

Every Physical Education teacher has equipment that they use on a daily basis. Whether they are teaching indoors, outdoors, or in an alternative space or location, these must-have pieces of equipment are always within reach. You know, those items you replenish every year because you use them ALL of the time? However, not every P.E. teacher’s list of essential equipment is going to look the same. Here our my most commonly used pieces of equipment (in no particular order) and 5 fun P.E. activities using them:

  • Poly Spots
  • Cones
  • Hula Hoops

Maze – Cooperative Activity

My favorite poly spot activity is a cooperative activity called Maze. You will need 30 poly spots and several already made maze cards for each group. Divide your class into 6 groups with about 5 students in each.

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How to Play:
The students set the 30 poly spots into a 6 x 5 grid. One student in each group holds the pre-made maze cards on one side of the poly spot grid and the other 4 students stand on the opposite side. One student at a time picks a poly spot that they think will get them through the maze. If correct, they can keep picking. If they are wrong, they go back to the end of the line and the next person goes. This keeps going until all the team members get out of the maze.

 

Musical Fitness

My second favorite activity that includes poly spots is Musical Fitness. All you need to play this activity is 30-40 poly spots and 30-40 fitness exercise cards. Place the exercise cards in a circle around the perimeter of the gym. Then place the ploy spots on top of the exercise cards. 

How to Play:
On the signal, have the students jog around the poly spots until the music tops. Whatever poly spot they stopped by is the exercise they need to perform. After 30-60 seconds, play the music again and have the students jog or perform a different movement activity around the ploy spots. Continue for 5-10 minutes. This activity is great for an instant activity/warm-up/ASAP to start class. 
 

Flip It Fitness

My favorite activity to play with my students involving cones is Flip It Fitness. Kevin Tiller created this idea and the overall objective of the game is modeled after the bottle flip craze. As your students enter the gym, have them pair up and go to a set of cones.

How to Play:
At the signal, each pair of students starts to flip their cones. The first one to flip their cone and land it wins. The student that wins does a victory push-up and the other person does jumping jacks until a new challenger arrives.  You can also do this activity in partner relay lines. In addition, you can write exercises on the cones themselves and have them perform the exercises when a cone flips and lands.

 

Target Holders

Another favorite use for cones is as target holders. Cones are great for all target games. You can use many skills including rolling, overhand throwing, and underhand throwing in order to get the students to hit the targets. You can also use a variety of equipment including throwing discs, foam dice, foam balls, etc.

 

Fitness Timer

My favorite hula-hoop activity is Hula Hoop Timer. Hand each student a hoop as they enter the gymnasium. You should have a series of exercises written on a whiteboard, a sheet of paper, or just have the students pick their own exercise.

How to Play:
At the signal, the students spin their hoop. While the hula hoops spins, the students perform the exercise until the hoop completely stops. You can also have them do this activity in pairs and you can specify what component of fitness they must perform. Look at a great video of this activity by Justin Cahill. 

For additional P.E. activities featuring hoops and poly spots, check out these blogs:

* Disclaimer: The activities described above are common P.E. Activities and are not my own creations.

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5 PE Fitness Stations with Slide Boards [Video]

Posted 3 months ago - by Shannon Jarvis Irwin

Slide boards are a great addition to physical education fitness stations! Transform classic fitness exercises like mountain climbers, bridge hold/hamstring curl, front lunges, side lunges, and shuffling by adding slide boards. I’ve also included a quick tutorial on how to make your own slide boards to help stretch those PE dollars!  

5 Fun Fitness Exercises Using Slide Boards:

 

Dimensions for the smaller slide boards shown in the video are 48” x 16” and the larger board is 2’ x 6’ with a piece of wooden molding attached to each end. This allows the students to push off to get momentum to slide.

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You can purchase slide boards here or I’ve included instructions for making your own below!

How to make a Slide Board:

Take a trip to your local hardware store and pick up a sheet of Smooth White Panel Board. Some stores may refer to it as Hard Board or Shower Board. It typically comes in a large 4ft x 8ft sheet for less than $15. You can even ask the store associate to cut it down to any size desired using their wall-mount saw; most of your major hardware stores have this option available. Score! No clean up on your end.

You will also need some type of cloth to use under your student’s shoes to help their feet slide on the board. I use 2 types with my students depending on the exercise: washcloths or a cloth book cover cut in half that the students can slip on over their shoes.

The slide boards will become less slippery the more they are used. TIP: Use Pledge furniture spray to wipe down your boards to regain its slick surface.

Enjoy!

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Fun Fitness Circuits for PE [Video]

Posted 3 months ago - by Jason Gemberling

Circuit Training is one of the best ways to get all of your students actively engaged at their own pace and ability, which in the world of differentiating, this is a jackpot winner! I teach high school students, and we do several styles of circuits throughout the year based on what fitness areas we need to improve and also space and time. The circuits that we use can easily be adapted to any level of students, but please keep one thing in mind, doing circuit training all year or even for extended periods of time will not work for all students! You need to add variety and frequency to your circuits. Imagine if your only form of exercise was intense circuit training, you would lose interest too!

We do three, for lack of a better word, “types” of circuits in program; whole group, small group, and while you wait (this is one of my favorites because it keeps all kids active at all times!). For each “type” of circuit we do, we try to incorporate a lot of variety and also try to hit as many muscle groups as possible. We have extremely wide ranges of ability levels in our classes, so we feel circuit training is a great way to reach all of our students.

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Whole Group Circuits

Our whole group circuits take place either in our main gymnasium, or outside if the weather permits, with our entire class. These circuits will also include cardio, which is something that really ramps the circuits up. One of our favorites to do is called the Rep & Run 300. I am going to give a shout out to Maria Corte for introducing this circuit to me at a conference! In this circuit we set up 15 stations, with exercises ranging from push-ups to military presses with weight plates. And if you are lacking the equipment do not panic, use your imagination and student body weight to accomplish very similar results in your circuit. I won’t lie there are times we do no equipment circuits, because setting up 15 stations and taking them down every day or even within the day can be a pain!

 


The goal of the Rep and Run 300 is for students to start at one of the 15 stations and complete 20 repetitions as quickly as possible utilizing proper form which would give them 300 repetitions in the end. After they finish at a station, the students will leave the center of the gym and jog 3 laps around the perimeter of the gym floor, I encourage you to measure this so your students know how far they are jogging. When they are done with their jog, they re-enter the circuit and move to the next station. This is a very challenging circuit, but the beauty is that the students work at their pace and ability.

Another circuit you could use for a large group would be a Partner Circuit. The video describes what a partner circuit could look like in my gymnasium. Again, this a great circuit to use to get every student in class actively participating on their level.

 

Small Group Circuits

 

For small group circuits, we utilize a variety of equipment and try to make it so students can safely and effectively get through in a small space. We do our small group circuits in our auxiliary gymnasium which is less than half the size of our main gymnasium. When we do small group circuits we have students divided in half with half the group doing their cardio workout on spin bikes in the same space and the other half doing the strength circuit. For our cardio, we have our students do up-down workouts.

Up-down workouts are when students pedal at a required gear at a specific RPM while seated and then when they go up they increase the gear and pedal as hard and fast as they can until they come back down. The intervals for these workouts range from 1 minute down-15 seconds up to 3 minutes down-45 seconds up. Students start with 3 minutes of down to warm their legs up and finish with 3 minutes down to cool down. Check out great spin and exercise bike options!

One of the circuits we do in small group is a mini version of the whole groups circuit. We like to start with this one before do whole group because it allows us to demonstrate proper technique, plus easily correct students because the group is smaller. We also love to use fitness bands in small group circuits because of the small space and the versatility bands provide. The video below will show you the fitness band circuit that we do in class. Remember that there are a lot more exercises you can have students do with fitness bands, so mix it up!

 

Fitness Band Circuit Example:

Everr station will be 20 reps and each exercise should be done slowly and controlled. 

  • Bent Over Row
  • Bicep Curl
  • Tricep Extension
  • Squats
  • Seated Row
  • Shoulder Press
  • Forward Raise
  • Lateral Raise
  • Seated Leg Press
  • Monkeys

 

While You Wait Circuit

 

I love While You Wait Circuits! They keep ALL of our students active at ALL times! We play a variety of games in our classes from Pickleball (all-time best game) to Tchoukball and because our gym is on the small side we don’t have room for all of our students to participate at one time. So, instead of the sitting and waiting to play, we created the While You Wait Circuits! These circuits can be just about anything you want to have students do in the small space you have while they wait. We typically pick 5 exercises that require no equipment have the students do 10 to 30 reps per exercise. The rule for this is that your team can’t get back into play until every member has completed the circuit at least 1 time and those that have completed it keep going. Below is one example of a While You Wait Circuit and a short video demonstration.

While You Wait Circuit Example:

  • 1- Squats – 15 reps
  • 2- Ab of your choice – 25 reps
  • 3- High Knees – 30 steps
  • 4- Push-Ups – 20 reps
  • 5- Rocket Jumps – 20 reps

These are just a small sampling of circuits, and I encourage you to be creative when you create your own circuits. Keep in my mind your student’s abilities, the space you are working with, and the equipment you have at your disposal when you create your circuits. Try to make the circuits fun by cranking up the music and even jumping into the mix with students and showing them that you can do it too! Another fun way to get students more engaged is to invite and encourage other faculty members to join your classes during their planning periods!

I have had many teachers join us and you would be amazed at the increase in effort during class when the math teacher shows up to work out with your class! And finally, as I stated earlier, you do not need a lot of equipment or really any equipment to create successful circuits. Look in the hallway and around your gymnasium or outside classroom for structures or benches or stairs and incorporate these items into your workouts, for example you can have students do dips using bench outside or push-ups with their feet elevated. The sky is the limit,so use your imagination and have fun!

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Focus on Fitness or Intertwine Your Fitness Focus?

Posted 3 months ago - by Dr. Lisa Witherspoon

For many years there has been a struggle with physical education programs as to whether or not we focus on fitness or continue to teach skills that can also lead to a lifelong physical activity for children. This is a valid contemplation based on the fact that obesity rates are an issue and physical educators feel that children need to be getting as much moderate to vigorous physical activity as possible during school hours.

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The major issue with this concept is that physical educators do not have enough time during a typical class or during the week at school to help children accumulate the recommended amount of physical activity. Furthermore, fitness testing conducted once or twice a year should be used to set goals to help students and parents understand what the child needs to work towards to achieve a health fitness level. There is simply not enough time to do this for every student during the school year. So, do we focus on fitness or do we try to intertwine fitness throughout our curriculum?

 

Over the years, physical education has shifted from teaching skill-related fitness to health-related fitness. Our goal is to educate children on how their body works and what choices they can make to be healthy; especially when they leave high school and are making adult decisions related to their individual health. Many quality physical education programs understand that it is important to teach skills related to sports at the primary level and then progress to allowing children to choose what sports or activities they enjoy and begin to focus on those for their future health. Where does that leave teaching fitness? We all know fitness is a prime importance on living an active and healthy lifestyle.

Having units each school year in a curriculum focused on fitness is of extreme importance. Educating students on their muscles and how they work, bones of the body, heart rates, etc. is essential to help them understand how the body works and various activities they can do to maintain healthy fitness levels. However, the focus on fitness does not need to stop during these specific units. Throughout the school year, physical education teachers can intertwine a fitness focus during most skill units taught.

For example, any instant activity provided could allow the teacher to ask children how their heart is feeling or what muscles they feel are working during the activity. If teachers choose to have children stretch before or after a class, this is a great time to discuss the importance of flexibility (one of the components of fitness) without having to spend several classes on simply stretching. When teaching a skill-related unit of throwing or catching, incorporate activity tasks at some point in the lesson to provide extra moderate to vigorous activity time and then discuss this during the closure. Below are a few suggestions to consider helping children continue to learn fitness concepts while accomplishing teaching a variety of skill activities during physical education class:

1.  Technology: 

Pedometers and heart rate monitors are impactful inclusions in class that allow children to see the feedback individually of how their body is working and what they still need to do at home to accomplish healthy fitness levels for that day. Allowing them to reflect, journal, or discuss at then end of class or for a homework assignment is one simple option to foster their learning about fitness and their body.

 

2.  Sport-Related Skills: 

We teach students skills related to a variety of sports so they can learn what they enjoy and what they may continue to do, as they get older. Although some tasks during these units may require more sedentary time to teach the correct cues or form for the skill, every lesson should try to include an opportunity for the children to be at least moderately physically active. Self or small group challenges can provide children with this activity so they understand or can learn that skill related activities are healthy and active.

 

3.  Interdisciplinary Focus: 

Many school districts and organizations are expecting physical education teachers to include an interdisciplinary focus in their lessons. While we teachers already naturally do this consistently, some quality teachers like to include a main focus on spelling words, math, nutrition, etc. These lessons are very important but can also include a great deal of physical activity and fitness focus content based on how they are organized. For example, set up a distance equal to the distance of the pacer test and have children run to retrieve a letter, number, or word to complete a spelling word, math problem, or nutrition concept to accomplish the objective of the lesson.

 

4.  Weekly or Monthly Focus Vocabulary:  

Some quality teachers have found it beneficial and fun to create a “Muscle of the Month” and/or a “Bone of the Month” to be able to focus on a certain part of health fitness for the children during lessons. They are able to integrate/intertwine short discussions or content based on the monthly focus. Check out the Teach-nique Bones Instructional Banner and Teach-nique Muscles Instructional Banner! These enormous 5'W x 3'H banners, made from heavy-duty vinyl, allow for easy display and can be seen from across the gymn. 

 

While these are just a few suggestions for how to intertwine fitness into your every day classroom content, there are so many ways a teacher can incorporate fitness while still conducting skill-related physical education classes. Fitness is a huge responsibility for physical education teachers to instill in children. There is not enough time to do this during a unit or two during the school year.

Sport-related skills are also essential to teach children in order for children to feel comfortable and confident possibly pursuing an activity related to an activity outside of a fitness gym experience. Intertwining fitness make take some additional time to consider and plan. In the long run, children will benefit from continuing to understand and learn their bodies while also learning the important part of a skill based fitness curriculum.

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Superhero PE Games to Get Students Moving [Video]

Posted 3 months ago - by Gopher Community

In honor of National Superhero Day (April 28), we have compiled 5 fun superhero-themed games that your students will love! These games use Rainbow Sets of equipment to distinguish different superhero teams. Every color represents a different superhero!

  • Red = Ironman
  • Orange = The Human Torch
  • Yellow = Wolverine
  • Green = The Incredible Hulk
  • Blue = Superman / Superwoman
  • Purple = Batman, The Phantom, or Psylocke (Batman doesn’t have any superpowers so his character might be difficult to use in these games)

 

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Superpower Shakedown

 

Similar to Everybody’s It Tag, students run around the gym trying to collect super powers (flags) from other students while protecting their own! We used Infinite Flag Belts to divide the players into 6 different superhero teams. Students will have a blast making up names for the new powers they acquire. The person with the largest arsenal of powers at the end of a designated time is the winner!

 

Super Power Pile-Up

 

Help! All of our superheroes have lost their powers! Place six hula hoops around the outside of the play area. Students must run around the gym, collect their super powers (ClassicCoat Balls) and return them to their base. Once a team has collected all of its super powers, they can steal powers from other teams. The team with the most super powers/balls at the end of a designated time is the winner!

 

Superhero Battle Royale

 

This game is a battle between all six superhero teams!  Players collect their colored superpowers (ClassicCoat Balls) scattered around the gym floor and work to score on the other team’s AllAround Jr. Goal - weakening them with every ball scored. The team with the least amount of balls in their team’s goal is the winner!

 

Superhero Revival

 

Teams designate a player to tag other superheroes with their team’s colored ClassicCoat Balls! If tagged with the ball, the player is drained of all of their powers and must go back to their base to revive. In order to revive, the player must perform 10 burpees to be allowed back into the game! Nobody is safe! Even taggers can still be tagged by other teams.

 

ACTION! Super Shielders

 

Students will love this unique superhero-themed game available only from Gopher. The goal of Super Shielders is to protect your city while the other team tries to knock over your team’s buildings. Superheroes will love the cape and shield that comes with the set. Add a unique twist to the game with archenemies that can tag anybody and make them perform an exercise before returning to the game. The first team to knock over their opponent’s buildings is the winner. This game includes activity instructions with even more game ideas and variations! Shop or learn more about Super Shielders!

 

Your students will have a blast saving the world with these fun superhero games for physical education!

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5 Unique Game Ideas with Block 'Em [Video]

Posted 4 months ago - by Gopher Community

In ACTION! Block ‘Em, students use foam blocks to build a 6 x 6 block tower while preventing the opposing team from knocking it over. Students love this fun twist to a knockdown-style game, but the best news is that these blocks can be used for so much more!

Check out 5 unique PE activity ideas to use with ACTION! Block ‘Em:

 

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Spelling Bee Block ‘Em:

 

The foam blocks can be used to spell out words in a team relay! Encourage students to come up with and spell out the most creative word or have each team spell out the same word in a timed relay. Correct spelling and legibility count!

 

Block ‘Em Breakdown:

 

Each team has 4 - 6 stacks of blocks on opposing ends of the play area. Teams must protect their stacks of blocks while trying to knock over the opposing team’s stacks.  The team to completely demolish the other team’s stacks first, wins!

 

Building Block ‘Em:

 

Instead of destroying towers, this game focuses on building them. Teams work together in a relay-style game to try and build the fastest pyramid. Students can be creative in how their pyramid is built! For a fun addition to the game, create a knockdown component. The first team to build its pyramid and knock it down is the winner! Students can either build a really tall and slim tower that’s riskier to build, but easier to knock over or a really sturdy structure that’s harder to knock down.

 

Block ‘Em Bowling:

 

Stack the foam blocks as a pyramid and have kids bowl to knock them all down. Blocks can also be scattered around the play area to be knocked over individually in a knockdown game!

 

ACTION! Block 'Em: 

 

In the classic game of ACTION! Block ‘Em, students try to build a 6 x 6 block wall while the other team tries to knock it over. Students can either work to build the wall, protect it, or knock down the other team’s wall. Every block that gets knocked over by the other team must be returned to the center play area. The first team to build their wall is the winner!

 

ACTION! Block ‘Em is an extremely versatile game and makes for a great addition to your physical education supplies. Each pack comes with activity instructions with even more game ideas and variations – check it out here!

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The PE Game Your Equipment Room Needs [Video]

Posted 4 months ago - by Gopher Community

As a physical educator, purchasing equipment that can be used for multiple activities and units is like hitting the jackpot! One of our favorite items that’s big on versatility is ToppleTubes. ToppleTubes are unique 2-color tubes with endless uses in physical education. They’re great for PE games and activities like stacking, relays, and knockdown, but their versatility also makes them a great addition for sport-skill units and fitness activities.

We’ve put together 10 game and activity ideas that will make ToppleTubes your favorite piece of equipment!

Continue reading...

 

Football Skills

ToppleTubes can be a great addition to any agility drill. Use them in your football unit for the 3-cone drill or quarterback movement drills. Practice juking by having students juke left if yellow is facing up and right if blue is facing up. Lastly, use ToppleTubes as catching boundaries or targets!

 

 

Basketball Skills

Use ToppleTubes during your basketball unit by having students dribble from tube to tube and flip them over to their team’s color. This activity is great for practicing control and maintaining space. 

 

 

 

Topple Balance

Place a ToppleTube on each end of a balance beam. Students must walk to one end, bend down, flip the ToppleTube over, and then repeat the same steps on the other side. Have students flip each ToppleTube over 5 times for ultimate practice!

 

 

ToppleTube Tip Over

Two teams each have a designated number of ToppleTubes that they must protect. Defenders try to defend their ToppleTube, while offenders try to knock over the other team’s ToppleTube. If an opponent knocks over a ToppleTube, he/she flips the tube over and possession changes. The team with the most ToppleTubes with their team’s color facing up at end of a designated time is the winner!

 

 

Indoor Baseball of Softball

Refine aim and control during indoor baseball or softball units by using ToppleTubes as targets for grounders! ToppleTubes can also be used for a variety of strength and conditioning exercises or activities for baseball or softball teams.

 

 

 

ToppleTube Cardio

Space the ToppleTubes around the gym for teams to compete against each other by flipping the ToppleTube over to their team’s color. Switch up the movement for a great warm-up activity!

 

 

 

Fitness Games & Activities

Instead of completing 10 reps of lunges or push-ups, have students alternate with a partner! Whenever they complete a rep, flip the ToppleTube over to their color. When the music stops, whoever’s color is facing up earns a point! Another fitness activity is to practice Russian Twists in a circle and use the ToppleTubes to pass around the circle.

 

 

Tennis Targets

ToppleTubes are great for tennis targets! Place the ToppleTubes a few feet in front of your students and have them aim to knock them over with the tennis ball. This will help your students to practice rallying and control.

 

 

 

ToppleTube Target Knockdown

Players aim to knock down their opponent’s ToppleTubes. If it is knocked over, the student must run over and flip the ToppleTube to their team’s color. The team with the most colors facing up, wins!

 

 

 

Building/Stacking Relay

 In a relay style game, students race to the other end of the gym to build a pyramid using all of their ToppleTubes. Once their pyramid is complete, they must use their three foam balls to knock down all of their ToppleTubes. The first team to knock all of them over, wins!

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