A New PE Tool for Skill Assessment | Ep. #12 PE Express Podcast

Hey, I’m going to share a few tips for using a teacher checklist as an assessment tool to gather useful data.

What is a Teacher Checklist?

A teacher checklist is a fundamental tool for teachers when they’re using assessments. Most importantly, the day they gather with a teacher checklist is particularly useful for immediate feedback for students and great value for making curriculum changes and modifications. A teacher checklist is essentially just a table along the side going vertical are the students’ names and along the top are the cues that you use for observing. I like to refer to this type of assessment as a process based assessment that we’re assessing the process of performing the skill, a product base assessment. will be assessing how many times a student hits the target while throwing. A focus on the process allow students to experience success, which is consistent with motivational research that successes is an indicator of long-term physical activity. Most students can perform cues and that’s why I like to do this and use this type of assessment and they get to experience success and some students may never get the product but they can learn the process and experience some success.

How to Use a Teacher Checklist

For a teacher checklist, students engage in the activity. The teacher observes and makes notes of the students’ performance on a specific queue. For instance, let’s say that I’m using throwing and my cues are T, elbow, step, and throw. The teacher provides these cues as the students are learning and allows them time to practice and then the teacher steps back at some point at that lesson or even in a future lesson and watches students throw and observes each student’s performance individually. And if a cues not observed, they simply go in that cell of their teacher checklist and make a checkmark. After observing all the students then they have like a quick scan of the table or checklist and they can look and see, wow, none of my students are making a T before or wow, all of them are making that T.

Analyzing a Teacher Checklist

So maybe none of the students are following through. So I’m going to use a different queue. I use throw and I mean follow through. But man, maybe I need to use follow through as my queue. So as a teacher I can make that immediate response based on the performance of the students. Teacher checklists can also be used to look at students individually and it forces teachers to do that. For example, let’s say that a teacher looks at watches Javier and sees he’s not stepping. He can provide immediate feedback and what I found through my experience is if you don’t do that and if you don’t a tool, it’s very difficult to really see each student and document their individual student data. So in sum, a teacher checklist is a great tool for providing immediate student feedback and it makes database curricular changes to help the student performance and motivation. Be sure to go to the dynamicpeasap.com website. If you haven’t already visited that via gopher, and there are many, many checklists that are available through there that provide standard based outcomes and the assessments are developed based on these standards based outcomes. We’d love to hear what you think. THRIVE.

Aaron is a Professor in the Department of Kinesiology and Health Promotion at the University of Kentucky. He is a trainer for physical education faculty, after-school staff, early child care staff and youth sport coaches and has co-authored several national documents including CDC's Physical Education Curriculum Analysis Tool and NASPE's Comprehensive School Physical Activity Promotion: A Position Statement. Beighle is the co-author of four books; Promoting Physical Activity and Health in the Classroom, Pedometer Power, Pedometer Power 2nd ed., Dynamic Physical Education for Elementary School Children. He's also served on the National Physical Activity Plan Education Sector Committee and the NASPE Task Force.

Aaron is a Professor in the Department of Kinesiology and Health Promotion at the University of Kentucky. He is a trainer for physical education faculty, after-school staff, early child care staff and youth sport coaches and has co-authored several national documents including CDC's Physical Education Curriculum Analysis Tool and NASPE's Comprehensive School Physical Activity Promotion: A Position Statement. Beighle is the co-author of four books; Promoting Physical Activity and Health in the Classroom, Pedometer Power, Pedometer Power 2nd ed., Dynamic Physical Education for Elementary School Children. He's also served on the National Physical Activity Plan Education Sector Committee and the NASPE Task Force.

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