Active@Home: Activity Calendars for Home Workouts

Physical Education teachers can use activity calendars and activity challenges as a way to motivate students to be physically active at home. This promotes overall student fitness and is a great way to build connection within families as well.

[0:02] Utilizing an activity log, and or a nutrition log is a great way to have students apply their learning outside of school.

Utilizing an Activity Log

[0:20] One of our primary goals as physical education teachers is for our students to be physically active outside of the classroom. We want them to apply the skills that they’ve learned with us at home and in the community. So how do we have them reflect upon that and track their progress? One way to do this is by utilizing an activity log, whether it’s an electronic version or a paper version, using some sort of log for the students to be able to have to record what they did, and reflect upon what they did as a meaningful way to get them to be able to apply their learning.

What to Include in an Activity Log

[0:56] When using an activity log, have the students record what it is they did, how long they did the activity for, what intensity level it was and then what area fitness or health related fitness component it complemented the most. This helps students apply the FITT principles well: Frequency, intensity, time and type. How many days a week did they work out? What areas of fitness did they work out? For how long and at what intensity levels? On activity logs, you could also ask students, how did they feel after working out? Did they enjoy the activity? Would they do it again? Depending upon the age level of your students will depend upon the complexity and simplicity of your activity log. You may choose to collect the activity logs and then later on have students analyze their logs and then reflect upon trends that they see and then try and set a goal to increase our physical activity behaviors or maintain them if they’re already doing really well at meeting the daily recommendations. Another log that you might try with students is some sort of nutrition based log. Whether it’s logging all of their meals, or trying out some sort of nutrition challenge, such as: logging your fruits and vegetables, or trying something new or helping cook something at home.

[2:12] Nutrition and physical activity logs are a great tool for Physical Education teachers to utilize to help students apply their learning outside of the classroom. Thanks for listening. Thanks for teaching, and I wish you all a wonderful day.

Jessica is a Physical Education Teacher, NBCT in Moscow, Idaho. She is the 2012 National NASPE Middle School Physical Education Teacher of the Year, a National Board certified Physical Education Specialist, and served on the SHAPE Idaho board for over 7 years as President, Conference Manager and District Representative. She has and continues to travel the country providing professional development workshops and keynotes on a variety of topics.

Jessica is a Physical Education Teacher, NBCT in Moscow, Idaho. She is the 2012 National NASPE Middle School Physical Education Teacher of the Year, a National Board certified Physical Education Specialist, and served on the SHAPE Idaho board for over 7 years as President, Conference Manager and District Representative. She has and continues to travel the country providing professional development workshops and keynotes on a variety of topics.

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