Closing activities are designed to provide students an opportunity to apply the skills they have learned in the lesson and/or to end the lesson with an enjoyable activity, again tied to an outcome. I’m not sure why, but Five Passes is my all-time favorite, but I have written about that one already.

Here are 5 of my favorite closing activities within the DynamicPEASAP.com curriculum:

Sneak Attack

This game is SOOOO exciting for students. Trust me, it works for K-….. The anticipation of the teacher calling out “SNEAK ATTACK” or hitting the tambourine is awesome. Spice this one up a bit and have them pretend to be ninjas or secret agents as the sneak up.

DynamicPE_ASAP_K-2_Closing_Sneak-Attack

Alaskan Baseball

I learned this game more than 20 years ago at a workshop and have used it ever since. It’s active, exhausting, and CRAZY fun. As with any vigorous activity, it’s a great idea to stop the game to discuss strategy or any other specific outcome. This helps you reiterate your outcomes and gives students a much-needed break. But don’t talk too long, let them get back at it with 20-30 seconds.

DynamicPE_ASAP_3-4_Closing_Alaska-Baseball

Cooperative Challenges

Any cooperative type activities are always a favorite of mine. I love setting the stage with an outlandish story that hooks students (a sea of lava always seems to get them excited) and then stepping back and watching them work. It is always fascinating. I am careful not to give too much guidance but just enough. And always debrief at the end to see if they applied any cooperative concepts. It doesn’t hurt to stop them in the middle and reinforce these concepts. Often they get going in the activity and forget to consider they are using them.

DynamicPE_ASAP_3-4_LessonFocus_Lesson_20_Cooperative_Game_Skills

Any small sided games

I am a sucker for any 2 v 2 or 3 v 3 activities. Dynamicpeasap.com is full of them for the 3-8 grade closing activities. I love providing students with just enough to get going and then seeing where they go. These games are so fast paced that stopping a group and asking, “How’s it going?” or “What can we change?” or “Any rules needed?” or “What skills are we applying” might be needed.

Walking Interviews

I have only started using these in the last four years and they are becoming a go to activity. They are active and allow students to reflect on content from the lesson. And they could be used as an assessment. Sometimes I might use a prescribed question or prompt but at times my prompt is “What did you learn today?” Be sure to ask students what they talked about, either as they walk or the class as a whole. You will be fascinated to see what connects with them.

These are just a few of my favorite activities. What are yours? I hope you give them a shot. tHRIVE

Aaron is a Professor in the Department of Kinesiology and Health Promotion at the University of Kentucky. He is a trainer for physical education faculty, after-school staff, early child care staff and youth sport coaches and has co-authored several national documents including CDC's Physical Education Curriculum Analysis Tool and NASPE's Comprehensive School Physical Activity Promotion: A Position Statement. Beighle is the co-author of four books; Promoting Physical Activity and Health in the Classroom, Pedometer Power, Pedometer Power 2nd ed., Dynamic Physical Education for Elementary School Children. He's also served on the National Physical Activity Plan Education Sector Committee and the NASPE Task Force.

Aaron is a Professor in the Department of Kinesiology and Health Promotion at the University of Kentucky. He is a trainer for physical education faculty, after-school staff, early child care staff and youth sport coaches and has co-authored several national documents including CDC's Physical Education Curriculum Analysis Tool and NASPE's Comprehensive School Physical Activity Promotion: A Position Statement. Beighle is the co-author of four books; Promoting Physical Activity and Health in the Classroom, Pedometer Power, Pedometer Power 2nd ed., Dynamic Physical Education for Elementary School Children. He's also served on the National Physical Activity Plan Education Sector Committee and the NASPE Task Force.

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