Rainy-Day Activities to Keep Students Moving

Brain Breaks Rainy-Day ActivitiesThere are some days that you’re left without your gymnasium or field, so how can you keep students moving when physical education is moved into a classroom? I’ve shared two rainy-day activities that are great for indoor classrooms!

When it comes to weather such as rain, snow, or extreme heat, sometimes it is difficult to find indoor activities that keep students motivated and moving. Some teachers do not have an indoor facility such as a gymnasium or multi-purpose room available, and for those that do, sometimes you’re “kicked out” for a school assembly or other school-wide function. Many physical education teachers have experienced conducting their classes in a small classroom with desks. While this is sometimes a great opportunity to teach content involving wellness topics (nutrition, safety, health, etc.), many times we want students to be able to get up and move, which is difficult considering the physical environment available.

Two activities that have become more popular and successful with teachers and students for an indoor activity are GoNoodle® and HOPSports Brain Breaks®.  Both simply require the Internet and a source to project what is displayed on a device (computer, tablet, smartphone) onto a large screen or wall space. Students are able to stand by their desk or in personal space to participate in the activities chosen.

What do they offer?

GoNoodle®

Brain Breaks®

Age-appropriate activities

Yes

Yes

Variety of activities

Yes

Yes

Available for classroom teachers to encourage more physical activity time

Yes

Yes

Teacher-friendly (usage)

Yes

Yes

Easy-to-follow for students

Yes

Yes

Unique content such as yoga, martial arts, and dance

Yes

(Not martial arts)

Yes

HOPSports Break Breaks for Rainy-day activitiesWith the simple click on a device, both GoNoodle® and Brain Breaks® can offer teachers a large variety of activities for students. One unique feature with both websites is that teachers can choose content areas that they may not feel comfortable teaching, such as yoga and dance, so students are able to participate in these activities that are developmentally appropriate and healthy. Students simply follow the instructors on the screen while teachers are able to walk around and provide feedback to assist the students’ learning.

Another way teachers can implement these activities is through an instant activity or bell work before class instruction begins. Rainy or snowy days or limited space situations do not have to be bothersome. These are two of the many ideas teachers can explore to get their students up and moving while enjoying being physical active.

Learn more or shop Brain Breaks® today!

Looking for more rainy-day activities? Check out No Gym, No Field, No Problem by Shannon Jarvis Irwin.

Lisa is a former Assistant Professor at The University of South Florida's Department of Teaching and Learning. She is also the former Director of the USF Active Gaming Research Laboratories.

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