Standard 5 Assessments Made Easy

SHAPE America’s Standard 5 reads, “The physically literate individual recognizes the value of physical activity for health, enjoyment, challenge, self-expression and/or social interaction.” You have all read it. If you haven’t, you just did.

In my experience, this is the standard Physical Education teachers struggle to assess the most. And some could argue that teaching students to value physical activity is one of our most important tasks. In essence, this standard suggests that as Physical Educators, we want students to leave our program believing that physical activity is important. The reasons they value physical activity are endless but health, enjoyment, challenge, self-expression, and social interaction seem to incapsulate most of the reasons I can think of right now.

What Does it Look Like to Value Physical Activity?

If we agree students should value physical activity, how do we assess if students are learning to value physical activity? “Value” is such a complex term that it can be difficult to break down into components that we are able to be assessed. Fortunately, the SHAPE America Grade Level Outcomes provide a start to this process. This document suggests at the core of valuing physical activity is learning the health benefits of physical activity and exploring the role of challenge in movement. Further, students should learn the activities they enjoy, analyze why they enjoy those activity, and discuss the positive social benefits of physical activity engagement. For each of these concepts a progression is provided. For instance, students progress from just being able to say, “I like that activity,” which at a young age is most activities, to analyzing why they like an activity, discussing why it brings them joy, and comparing their owns reasons for enjoying physical activity with their peers’ reasons. From my perspective, this part of Standard 5 has always made sense.

How Can you Assess Value?

The difficult part is to assess these constructs. At least I used to think it was difficult. For several years, I dug and unpacked this standard and discovered assessing it is not as difficult as I thought. Below, I provide several assessments designed specifically for Standard 5 and these concepts.

First, a little about these assessments.

  1. They are all from DynamicPEASAP.com. Sign up with your email, and they are yours FOR FREE. What I have provided here are just a few. There are 100+ formative assessments on the site.
  2. Each assessment is based on a single outcome statement.
  3. Read this blog for the types of assessments. In short, we provide teacher questioning, teacher checklists, self-assessment, peer assessment, written exit slips, and bike racks.
  4. The assessments are available for K-8.

Sign up for DynamicPEASAP.com. Dig into these assessments for Standard 5 and let us know what you think. Teacher feedback is always the best feedback we receive. tHRIVE!

1. Throwing Assessment

Outcome: I can identify activities that might be challenging for me. 

2. Rhythmic Movement Assessment

 Outcome: I can perform simple rhythmic movements

3. Soccer Skills Assessment:

 Outcome: I can rank my enjoyment of soccer compared to other physical education activities. 

4. Playground Games and Recreational Activities Assessment

 Outcome: I can rank the enjoyment of a variety of recreational activities. 

5. Gymnastics Skills Assessment:

 Outcome: I can compare the health benefits of gymnastics to the health benefits of other activities. 

Aaron is a Professor in the Department of Kinesiology and Health Promotion at the University of Kentucky. He is a trainer for physical education faculty, after-school staff, early child care staff and youth sport coaches and has co-authored several national documents including CDC's Physical Education Curriculum Analysis Tool and NASPE's Comprehensive School Physical Activity Promotion: A Position Statement. Beighle is the co-author of four books; Promoting Physical Activity and Health in the Classroom, Pedometer Power, Pedometer Power 2nd ed., Dynamic Physical Education for Elementary School Children. He's also served on the National Physical Activity Plan Education Sector Committee and the NASPE Task Force.

Aaron is a Professor in the Department of Kinesiology and Health Promotion at the University of Kentucky. He is a trainer for physical education faculty, after-school staff, early child care staff and youth sport coaches and has co-authored several national documents including CDC's Physical Education Curriculum Analysis Tool and NASPE's Comprehensive School Physical Activity Promotion: A Position Statement. Beighle is the co-author of four books; Promoting Physical Activity and Health in the Classroom, Pedometer Power, Pedometer Power 2nd ed., Dynamic Physical Education for Elementary School Children. He's also served on the National Physical Activity Plan Education Sector Committee and the NASPE Task Force.

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